The Butterfly Loop as an end-loop

tied through a mounted ring, around a tall pole, etc.

The method presented here for tying the Butterfly loop as an end loop through a mounted ring is not new, but the presentation is clearer, to me at least, than the ones I've seen. There are plenty of good presentations of  ways to tie the Butterfly Loop on the bight (in the middle of the rope).  In fact, two of the methods I describe  elsewhere for tying the Butterfly Bend are trivially derived from methods for tying the Butterfly Loop on the bight.  Conversely, the original methods for tying the Butterfly Loop on the bight are trivially derivable from the same two methods for tying the Butterfly Bend.

If a needed end loop does not have to be tied through a mounted ring or the equivalent, any way of tying the Butterfly Loop on the bight will do: just tie the loop near the end of the cord.

To begin the Butterfly loop as an end knot through a mounted ring, tie an underhand knot, i.e. an overhand knot as tied by a left handed person.  You could of course start with an overhand knot, but starting with an underhand knot allows us to keep the second overhand knot on top as it is being formed, for clarity, and for uniformity of presentation with Method 4 of the Butterfly Bend and with the Butterfly Bend Loop. Pass the working end through the ring, to produce the result seen in the first photo. Note that  in the second photo the standing part and the working end emerge from the upper side of the underhand knot.   In the fourth photo, again the standing part and the working end emerge from the same side of the knot and are parallel and adjacent.

Two ways of dressing the finished knot are shown in the final two photographs below: the closed form and the open form. The closed form is produced  by pulling the standing part and the working end in the forth photo together away from the ring.  The open form is produced from the result shown in the fourth photo by pulling the standing part and the working end in opposite directions.  Both forms should be dressed to compact firmness before being loaded.  Keeping as much of the second overhand knot distinctly above the first one, binding as little of the structure of the first overhand as possible, as shown in photos three, four, and five, aids in getting the correct dressing without having to fiddle with the knot, allowing a simple pull to do most of the dressing, either with the standing part and the working end together, as for the closed form, photo five, or being pulled in oppposite directions as for the open form, photo six.  This precaution is very important for stiff rope, and is not very important for flexible rope.

In jam tests with thin braided nylon cord loaded sufficiently to stretch the cord by about 25%, both the closed form and the open form were jammy, although the open form was less jammy.

The Butterfly Bend Loop was slightly less jammy than either dressed form of the Butterfly Loop loaded as an end loop. The Butterfly Bend Loop is a better knot with the same purpose as this one.

Alpine-butterfly-loop-m2-01.jpg Alpine-butterfly-loop-m2-02.jpg Alpine-butterfly-loop-m2-03.jpg Alpine-butterfly-loop-m2-04.jpg Alpine-butterfly-loop-m2-05.jpg Alpine-butterfly-loop-m2-06.jpg

 End of procedure

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